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Inside Leslie Jenkins Pretty Tyler Home

BY JESSICA ELLIOTT | PUBLISHED IN D HOME SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2018 | PHOTOGRAPHY BY ELIZABETH LAVIN

More than two decades ago, interior designer Leslie Jenkins had the savvy to shop European markets with Cynthia Collins, bringing treasures home in trunks to sell out of her house. (friends clamored for her finds.) Her prowess has since evolved—she now co-owns Uptown interiors boutique Blue Print and adjacent Blue Print Gallery, and she mixes her Parisian and English finds in all sorts of projects through her design firm, Jenkins Interiors. A Dallas native, her own home embodies her aesthetic: an effortlessly cultivated, collected style that feels sophisticated without pretension.

Jenkins’ 1940s four-bedroom home was built by renowned architect Shirley Simons for a prominent Southern family, like many historic homes in Tyler. “They were huge entertainers,” Jenkins says, “so the two front rooms are extremely large for the scale of the house—it was a challenge for me.”


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Building History

A NEW CONSTRUCTION HOME OVERFLOWING WITH TIMELESS ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS AND CLASSIC FURNISHINGS PERFECTLY MELDS THE PRESENT WITH THE PAST FOR A DALLAS FAMILY

BY TIFFANY ADAMS | PUBLISHED IN SOUTHERN HOME MAY/JUNE 2018 | PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN SCHRODER

Goodbyes are never easy. That’s part of the reason this Dallas family decided moving to another neighborhood wasn’t an option. However, style updates, as well as the need for a separate in-law quarters, pressed the desire for more space. “We had lived in the same house for 20 years, so we knew the value of the street,” the homeowner says. “Not only was it well located within the city, but it also held a lot of memories for us, such as walking our three children to elementary school. It’s really a small town in the midst of urban sprawl. We didn’t want to leave that.” Lucky for them, the house next door, which belonged to a family who had lived in the neighborhood for 40 years, became available. “They gave us their ‘blessing’ to tear the house down and start fresh because they loved our street and knew we would build the type of home that would fit into the neighborhood,” the homeowner says. And, while they first considered remodeling the original home, in the end, this was the easiest way to achieve all of their goals.

Creating a new-construction home that appears to have been around for a century is no task for a novice. A friend of the homeowners who had recently worked with Leslie Jenkins of Jenkins Interiors connected them to the designer, and plans began to fall in place. “The owners wanted it to look like the house had always been there,” says Leslie. “Details were also super important to them,” adds Haley Powell, senior design associate at the firm, who worked alongside Jenkins on the project.


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A Park Setting Inspires A Light-Filled Dallas Home

BY JENNIFER SERGENT | PUBLISHED IN luxe.daily JANUARY 15, 2018

Given a rare opportunity to build within view of prime parkland in Dallas’ University Park neighborhood, a couple with three young boys wanted their new house to be just as special as its verdant setting. Achieving that required the efforts of a tried-and-true team, with designer Leslie Jenkins’ classically minded interiors pairing with architect David Stocker’s signature steel-framed windows and doors. “The owners wanted a modern, fresh element running through the home,” Jenkins says, “but with a traditional feel, so it would be a little more timeless.”

Keeping that balance in mind, the designer incorporated ceiling trim and crown molding in areas such as the living room, dressing its floor-to-ceiling windows in thick linen drapery. Throw in curvaceous furnishings and a marble- patterned replace surround, paired with a Claire Crowe Collection replace screen, and the space achieves a salon-like effect. “In the back of my mind, I always aim for a fresh take on Parisian style,” Jenkins says.


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Voted one of D Home’s Best Interior Designers in Dallas Six Years in a Row

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